Will LAws Change To This.......?

Discussion in 'Business and Economy' started by Swisslist, Oct 31, 2017.

  1. Swisslist

    Swisslist United States Member

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    You own a domain name with an Australian extension. You live, work and got that name in Australia.

    Current laws dictate that you cannot change the extension to another country while you are still in Australia.

    Someone in Germany wants to buy that domain from you, but current laws dictate that he cannot because he is not in Australia. Nor can the buyer request the seller to change the extension for the purpose of sale.

    It's a catch 22. Do you see laws like this in the future that would stifle the free market that the domain industry enjoys right now?
     
  2. dibon

    dibon Kenya Member

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    When did this law come into effect because I've never heard of such a restriction before? It seems then that this is more or less specific to Australia and perhaps an attempt to preserve Australian domains? It is definitely restrictive and I believe the free market is bound to feel the imapct.
     
  3. JackD

    JackD United States Active Member

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    Not for sure I understand what you mean. As far as I know, you cannot "change" the extension to any other extension anywhere in the world. If another extension is available then you can register that extension as long as it does not violate the laws of the ccTLD in that country. To register domains in the .UK extension I have to either live in the UK or have a UK representative in the UK with a UK address. So Australia is not unique in it's requirement that you live there or have interest there to own an Australian domain extension. Isn't there also restrictions on owning a .US extension and a .EU extension?
     
  4. marsh

    marsh Kenya Active Member

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    Can you have the same domain names, but with different extensions, provided that you are not dealing with the same thing or existing in the same industry? I understand that there are universal rules when it comes to domain names. I'd be more interested in the regulations that are unique to certain countries or regional blocs.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
  5. domain investor

    domain investor United Kingdom Member

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    I think it's just a question of looking up each domain extension individually to find the regulations regarding their registration.

    Take .io for instance. Anyone may register it, and probably only a small minority are people living in the Indian Ocean area.

    According to GoDaddy, .asia is available to individuals, businesses, organizations, and community groups, as long as one of your contacts lives in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Individuals can register a .jp domain name if they reside in Japan or have a company that is located there - the registrant contact country must be Japan.

    On the other hand, Namecheap says:

    India is a fast-growing market, and many businesses are using .in domain names to make headway in the country. The .in domain extension is a country code TLD (top-level domain) with no geographical requirements; anyone in any country may register a domain with this TLD.

    The .in extension seems more of an exception than the rule.